Fine tuning: Working with Jumping Dogs

Rowsey just needed to learn the value of keeping four on the floor

In my last blog post, I talked about my strategy for getting a dog who jumps up to not jump – turning my back on them and saying out loud something like “Nope, that’s not going to get you what you want.” This communication is key. But I didn’t mention timing as another important element of my use of the strategy: when I turn my back, I plant my feet and wait. I give the dog time to start wondering what’s next, then I turn back to them with my “this is serious stuff” face and gauge their reaction. If they make a start on jumping, I turn my back again, repeat my statement, and wait. With some shelter dogs, turning my back once has been enough to stop the behavior for the duration of the visit.

But a third key element is patience. Take the sweet boy above. In the first few minutes of our first encounter, I turned my back to him three or four times before he was convinced I was not going to interact with him till he kept his feet on the ground. He tested the waters a few more times during that first visit . . . but turning my back once was enough at that point. It took a couple of visits to really dial that behavior down to zero. I learned he was really smart, good-hearted, and eager to work for treats. He wasn’t a persistent jumper because he was bad, he was just super excited: he really, really wanted to do a meet-and-greet. He had a whole lot of affection to share and it was busting out all over. But that great meet-and-greet he wanted couldn’t happen till he quit jumping. Turning away from him communicated that.

Once the dog has gotten the message that jumping doesn’t get him what he wants (I’ve turned my back, made my statement, waited, turned around and the dog doesn’t respond by jumping), what comes next also requires timing. Although other people might give the dog a reward quickly for not jumping, I don’t. In every other situation I offer the reward without delay, but in this case I take the time – a few seconds – to share a good look with the dog. I want to be sure they’re committed to staying down before I say “yes” and give them a treat. I take that moment because I don’t want them to think, ‘I jump, she turns and gives me a treat, therefore jumping got me the treat.’

And that’s where the timing really comes in – if I turn and see the dog is excited and might jump but it looks like I have a little window of time, I quickly give them an alternative behavior. I choose the cue ‘sit’ if the dog seems too excited to respond well to ‘come,’ and that’s often the case on a first visit with a shelter dog. Why that cue? Almost all dogs past puppy hood know the cue “sit,” and even if they don’t, if they are interested in a treat at all, it is very easy to guide them to comply. With a dog who calms down pretty quickly and clearly has no thought of jumping, I say “yes” and treat, then move right to ‘come,’ because greeting, is, after all, the point, and I’ll be reinforcing a calm greeting.

On a first visit with a shelter dog, I can’t be sure if he knows this cue. So I “lure” him in with that first use of it, showing him the treat and bringing it down in front of me so he steps forward to get it. I want to create optimal conditions for him to follow through on my request, and the lure serves that purpose. (If you want to learn more about “lures” versus “rewards,” McCann Dogs has a very clear article and podcast about it. They use a misleading title to attract attention, but its great info: Why Food Fails in Dog Training

With clear communication, timing, and patience, a dog who jumps can be taught that ‘four on the floor’ is the greeting that gets rewarded. And Rowsey? Someone else figured out what an excellent dog he is – he’s been adopted.

Next up, Teaching “leave it.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.