A Three Dog Day

I don’t know how others were spending the last couple of days of 2021. But I can tell you how I was spending part of them – more time with the pups at the shelter! I usually spend about an hour at the shelter, visiting two dogs, one at a time. But these are holiday times, and the day before 2021 ended was a three dog day – I hung out with Pepper, Teddy, and Lizzy.

I’ve already introduced you to my sweetheart, Teddy. let me introduce you to Pepper.

Pepper’s a three year old who looks and acts like a sweet puppy.

When I take her to the shelter dog park she stays about 5 feet from me at first and then ventures further. I thought this was a sign about how people-oriented she is. And while I still think she is very affectionate and will make somebody a loving companion, I got a different idea about her when I took her up to the Annex for the first time. Check out her reaction to the park bench with its dog sculpture –

If it looks like a dog . . .

She’s the first dog who has reacted to that wooden dog as though it were a dog. Now I think when we’re in the park she sticks close because she hasn’t had much life experience. She was dubious about the agility tunnel as well, but she knew just what a metal folding chair was for – dog perch.

When Pepper headed for the chair, it was my turn to be dubious, but Pepper was pretty confident about getting up onto a slippery folding chair.

Pepper is a friendly, not very big dog. Makes her a good candidate for adoption . . . here’s hoping.

Next up was Teddy – he’s pretty business-like in the dog park, if you catch my meaning. I did get him to do a few zoomies before we headed to the Annex. And there – well, Teddy hits that room like a kid hits a play ground. He galloped a wide swoop then charged through the tunnel and to the park bench where he spun circles under the bench then popped to the other side of the bench and did circles there before galloping back in my direction. For Teddy, the Annex is FUN. A few minutes of that and then he’s ready to settle in for some serious cuddling. He is one sweet boy.

Gentleman Ted shifts from all-out play to relaxing. Belly rubs followed soon after!

On the way back to the shelter building we met another woman coming out. She is an amazing human being – she sets a chair by a kennel door and reads to the dogs. Teddy wanted to go to say hello to her, and she was all smiles. “He’s so different on leash!” she told me. And it’s true. If you walked the kennel hallway and that was your only sight of Teddy, he’d be just another shelter dog going bonkers at the sight of people. You’d only get a full idea about him if you got him away from that setting. Fingers crossed that someone takes the time to do that.

Last but not least, is Lizzy. This photo gives some sense of what she looks like, but you’d have to see her in person to appreciate the subtle blush of red that runs through her coat.

Lizzie’s a different kind of sweetheart – all puppy enthusiasm and naive good nature.

In earlier posts, I’ve compared hanging out with the shelter dogs to teaching. Here’s another way they are similar – as a teacher, there’s no guarantee that you’ll ever discover if you made much difference in any one students’ life. But sometimes, you’re pretty darn sure you did. I’m sure the woman who reads to the dogs makes a difference in their lives, and I’m sure the time I’ve spent with the various dogs has made a difference in their lives. I find myself wanting to give a sales pitch for hanging out with shelter dogs, but I’ll leave it at this – I hope in 2022 many more people discover the pleasure of visiting animals at a shelter.

Hanging out with the Shelter Dogs

The Potsdam Humane Society finally opened up its training sessions for volunteers in April. To say I was ready to spend some quality time with the pups would be the understatement of the year. Almost every week since then I’ve spent a few hours hanging out with the dogs. Today I met Angel Joleen.

Angel heading back to get a few more butt rubs.

Angel spent lots of her time just standing next to me while I petted her. I sat on the ground and started at her shoulders and moved my way down. When she figured that was enough she’d turn around so I could do the other side. Occasionally she’d head off to investigate the rest of the enclosure, and she was glad enough to chase a tennis ball a few times, but it was never long before we got back to the real business – a full back massage followed by a butt rub. At six and a half years old, her age might make some people overlook her, but with that beautiful brindle coat and that sweet disposition, I’m hoping someone finds their perfect match when they meet her.

Here’s another girl at the shelter: Belle.

Belle at rest

Belle’s two year and a half years old. I’ve visited with her five or six times. At the beginning of the first session she did a bit of jumping up, but she gave that up when I simply turned my back on her. Two facts to know about Belle: 1) She is a dog that sees one of her missions in life as destroying any toy she can get her teeth into – at the shelter they’ve hung the laundry basket that’s full of balls of all sorts high up on the chain link fence of the outdoor exercise yard.The first time I brought her there, I unhooked her leash and she bolted to the other end of the yard, leapt, and bopped the basket from underneath. Half-inflated basketballs and soccer balls and a couple of tennis balls went flying.

So, how’d I get a photo of Belle sitting calmly when there was a basket of balls to destroy just a few feet away? Fortunately, here’s fact: 2) Belle’s other mission in life is to figure out how to get treats. A food-motivated dog can be a thing of joy, and Belle fits that bill.

When I met her she already knew how to do a perfect “sit.” We’ve been working on adding “wait” to her catalog of commands. The best case scenario of training a dog is frequent, short training sessions – ideally, training would be interspersed throughout the day. But Belle and I don’t have all day – just 20-30 minutes. Given that on the first day she’d sit perfectly and then stand right back up, I’m pretty happy with our progress. Now, after asking for some super short wait times to remind her of the game, I’m able to move up to taking a couple of steps away and returning to her – or calling her to come to me – without her breaking from the sit.

Belle waiting for the release word (come) or for me to return to her.

Today I started working with her on “back up.” I do this simply by stepping close in to her and when she scoots back, giving the command “back up” and giving her the treat while I say “yes.” She caught on to this very quickly, although I’m not sure how I’ll get a good photo of that.

At the end of any visit, I try to create a few moments of calm. After 20 minutes of figuring out how to get treats, Belle’s ready to lay down and hang out. But I can tell she hasn’t forgotten about the treats.

Belle’s pretty sure she knows where those treats are

Our shelter does a great job matching up good dogs with good people, and I know the dog I work with today might not be here the next time I visit. Of course, that’s more than okay – it’s always good news when a dog’s been adopted. So for today, hats off to Angel and Belle: two sweet girls trusting us to find them good homes.